Why White House Was Painted White?

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The White House, the official residence and the chief workplace of the President of the United States is located in Washington DC. The White House was originally built between 1792 and 1800 on Georgian style with Aqua sandstone painted white. The architectural design of the White House was outlined by the Irish born architect James Hoban. In 1801, the U.S. President Thomas Jefferson after shifting into the house acquired the services of the architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe in order to expand the building exterior into two colonnades in order to hide the storage and stables. The White House has been the workplace of every U.S. President since John Adams. During the War of 1812, the British Army set the mansion on fire as a part of the Burning of Washington, which damage the large part of interior and exterior of the building. After the war ended, the reconstruction was commissioned immediately and by October 1817, the President, James Monroe shifted to the scantly reconstructed building. The South and the North Portico was added to the building in 1824 and 1829 respectively. Due to the congestion within the executive mansion, the President Theodore Roosevelt relocated nearly all the work offices to the newly built West Wing. Eight years after the construction of West Wing, the President William Howard Taft enlarged the West Wing and also raised the first Oval Office. The Office was moved to another position later with the expansion of the section. By enhancing the existing hip roof with long shed of dorms, the third floor attic was converted into living quarters in 1927. The new East Wing area was constructed as a reception area during social celebrations. The new wings were attached to the Jefferson's arcades. In 1946, a large number of alterations were made in the East Wing to make room for the additional office space. With the start of 1948, the authorities found that the house's main supporting exterior walls and the internal wooden beams were close to decay. At that time, Harry S. Truman became the President and ordered to substitute the rooms by new internal strong steel frame work. Today, the White House Complex consists of the West Wing, East Wing, Cabinet Room, Executive Residence, Roosevelt Room and the Old Executive Office Building that accommodates the executive offices for the President and Vice President. In past, the White House building was referred to as "President's House", "Presidential Mansion" or "President's Palace". The building was given the title of "The White House" for the first time in 1811. There is a myth behind designating this name to the building. During the reconstruction period, white paint was extensively used to cover the burn scratches it had sustained during the War and perhaps that was the reason behind assigning it the name. Before 1901, "Executive Mansion" was the title used in most of the official contexts; however, the President Theodore Roosevelt assigned the formal name to it as White House by getting printed "White House – Washington" printed on the official stationary and later by Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
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Tauqeer Ul Hassan has 1 articles online

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This article was published on 2010/12/07